Road Trippin

Undoubtedly, America was built for road trips, and vice versa. I’ve enjoyed my share in my day, short, long, and multi-day. To be sure, they still have their place in Europe, but I have found that there are a number of factors which make them feel like more of an afterthought in the transportation network, a means to an end rather than something to enjoy in themselves.

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Train travel is great. High-speed rail is a wonderful way to travel. Air travel here is ok too. Security is usually far less aggravating than anything involving the TSA, and higher gas prices make it easier to justify the cost of a plane ticket. But if your destination is far enough outside the main rail network, and not far enough away from your origin to want to deal with the temporal overhead of flying, then it’s time for a drive.

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French Review (2 out of 5 stars)

French is the fourth language I have made any attempt to learn, after Spanish, Russian, and of course English (it counts!). The options to fill my high school requirement for foreign language were French or Spanish, the two lanuages, which out of all the major languages in the world, were the two I least wanted to learn (figures). Out of those two, I didn’t care much for what I knew of the sound and mechanics of French, so I took Spanish. Now I’m learning French anyway, and it turns out…I was right.

I was initially surprised when I realized I’m learning a “fourth” language. It seemed like quite a high number for someone who “doesn’t enjoy” learning languages. But then, I wouldn’t say I “know” Spanish or Russian. (Although my brain sometimes pulls up Russian or Spanish words for things instead of French. I haven’t got everything straightened out yet.) I just learned more of them than I have Finnish or Esperanto. After almost a year of learning, I now know French better than my other two “second languages,” but I still wouldn’t say I “know” it.

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Culture Shock: It’s The Little Things

I’m not especially prone to culture shock. I’m willing to try new things and go on adventures (it’s why I’m here). Mostly it’s just an adjustment period until I establish new habits and preferences. In a way the bigger differences are easier to deal with because there’s fewer of them and you can retreat from them at home. But all the little things that are different add up to make even your own apartment seem foreign sometimes.

When you take a language class, there are always little culture lessons they give to you along the way. Tips to help you understand the language or get around when you visit another country. “The second floor is the first floor.” “Train travel is very common.” “Steak tartare is a thing.” But there are a lot more little things you start to notice when you spend a lot of time in a place, and especially when you establish a home there. Some are kind of neat, others take some getting used to. For example:

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